The Adventure of the Empty House – Part 4

Sentence 1:
Ronald Adair was fond of cards -- playing continually, but never for such stakes as would hurt him. He was a member of the Baldwin, the Cavendish, and the Bagatelle card clubs.
He had played nearly every day at one club or other, but he was a cautious player, and usually rose a winner.
Adair might have lost five pounds, but not more.
His fortune was a considerable one, and such a loss could not in any way affect him.
It was shown that, after dinner on the day of his death, he had played a rubber of whist at the latter club.
So much for his recent history as it came out at the inquest.
The evidence of those who had played with him -- Mr. Murray, Sir John Hardy, and Colonel Moran -- showed that the game was whist, and that there was a fairly equal fall of the cards.
It came out in evidence that, in partnership with Colonel Moran, he had actually won as much as four hundred and twenty pounds in a sitting, some weeks before, from Godfrey Milner and Lord Balmoral.
He had also played there in the afternoon.
Sentence 2:
Ronald Adair was fond of cards -- playing continually, but never for such stakes as would hurt him. He was a member of the Baldwin, the Cavendish, and the Bagatelle card clubs.
He had played nearly every day at one club or other, but he was a cautious player, and usually rose a winner.
Adair might have lost five pounds, but not more.
His fortune was a considerable one, and such a loss could not in any way affect him.
It was shown that, after dinner on the day of his death, he had played a rubber of whist at the latter club.
So much for his recent history as it came out at the inquest.
The evidence of those who had played with him -- Mr. Murray, Sir John Hardy, and Colonel Moran -- showed that the game was whist, and that there was a fairly equal fall of the cards.
It came out in evidence that, in partnership with Colonel Moran, he had actually won as much as four hundred and twenty pounds in a sitting, some weeks before, from Godfrey Milner and Lord Balmoral.
He had also played there in the afternoon.
Sentence 3:
Ronald Adair was fond of cards -- playing continually, but never for such stakes as would hurt him. He was a member of the Baldwin, the Cavendish, and the Bagatelle card clubs.
He had played nearly every day at one club or other, but he was a cautious player, and usually rose a winner.
Adair might have lost five pounds, but not more.
His fortune was a considerable one, and such a loss could not in any way affect him.
It was shown that, after dinner on the day of his death, he had played a rubber of whist at the latter club.
So much for his recent history as it came out at the inquest.
The evidence of those who had played with him -- Mr. Murray, Sir John Hardy, and Colonel Moran -- showed that the game was whist, and that there was a fairly equal fall of the cards.
It came out in evidence that, in partnership with Colonel Moran, he had actually won as much as four hundred and twenty pounds in a sitting, some weeks before, from Godfrey Milner and Lord Balmoral.
He had also played there in the afternoon.
Sentence 4:
Ronald Adair was fond of cards -- playing continually, but never for such stakes as would hurt him. He was a member of the Baldwin, the Cavendish, and the Bagatelle card clubs.
He had played nearly every day at one club or other, but he was a cautious player, and usually rose a winner.
Adair might have lost five pounds, but not more.
His fortune was a considerable one, and such a loss could not in any way affect him.
It was shown that, after dinner on the day of his death, he had played a rubber of whist at the latter club.
So much for his recent history as it came out at the inquest.
The evidence of those who had played with him -- Mr. Murray, Sir John Hardy, and Colonel Moran -- showed that the game was whist, and that there was a fairly equal fall of the cards.
It came out in evidence that, in partnership with Colonel Moran, he had actually won as much as four hundred and twenty pounds in a sitting, some weeks before, from Godfrey Milner and Lord Balmoral.
He had also played there in the afternoon.
Sentence 5:
Ronald Adair was fond of cards -- playing continually, but never for such stakes as would hurt him. He was a member of the Baldwin, the Cavendish, and the Bagatelle card clubs.
He had played nearly every day at one club or other, but he was a cautious player, and usually rose a winner.
Adair might have lost five pounds, but not more.
His fortune was a considerable one, and such a loss could not in any way affect him.
It was shown that, after dinner on the day of his death, he had played a rubber of whist at the latter club.
So much for his recent history as it came out at the inquest.
The evidence of those who had played with him -- Mr. Murray, Sir John Hardy, and Colonel Moran -- showed that the game was whist, and that there was a fairly equal fall of the cards.
It came out in evidence that, in partnership with Colonel Moran, he had actually won as much as four hundred and twenty pounds in a sitting, some weeks before, from Godfrey Milner and Lord Balmoral.
He had also played there in the afternoon.
Sentence 6:
Ronald Adair was fond of cards -- playing continually, but never for such stakes as would hurt him. He was a member of the Baldwin, the Cavendish, and the Bagatelle card clubs.
He had played nearly every day at one club or other, but he was a cautious player, and usually rose a winner.
Adair might have lost five pounds, but not more.
His fortune was a considerable one, and such a loss could not in any way affect him.
It was shown that, after dinner on the day of his death, he had played a rubber of whist at the latter club.
So much for his recent history as it came out at the inquest.
The evidence of those who had played with him -- Mr. Murray, Sir John Hardy, and Colonel Moran -- showed that the game was whist, and that there was a fairly equal fall of the cards.
It came out in evidence that, in partnership with Colonel Moran, he had actually won as much as four hundred and twenty pounds in a sitting, some weeks before, from Godfrey Milner and Lord Balmoral.
He had also played there in the afternoon.
Sentence 7:
Ronald Adair was fond of cards -- playing continually, but never for such stakes as would hurt him. He was a member of the Baldwin, the Cavendish, and the Bagatelle card clubs.
He had played nearly every day at one club or other, but he was a cautious player, and usually rose a winner.
Adair might have lost five pounds, but not more.
His fortune was a considerable one, and such a loss could not in any way affect him.
It was shown that, after dinner on the day of his death, he had played a rubber of whist at the latter club.
So much for his recent history as it came out at the inquest.
The evidence of those who had played with him -- Mr. Murray, Sir John Hardy, and Colonel Moran -- showed that the game was whist, and that there was a fairly equal fall of the cards.
It came out in evidence that, in partnership with Colonel Moran, he had actually won as much as four hundred and twenty pounds in a sitting, some weeks before, from Godfrey Milner and Lord Balmoral.
He had also played there in the afternoon.
Sentence 8:
Ronald Adair was fond of cards -- playing continually, but never for such stakes as would hurt him. He was a member of the Baldwin, the Cavendish, and the Bagatelle card clubs.
He had played nearly every day at one club or other, but he was a cautious player, and usually rose a winner.
Adair might have lost five pounds, but not more.
His fortune was a considerable one, and such a loss could not in any way affect him.
It was shown that, after dinner on the day of his death, he had played a rubber of whist at the latter club.
So much for his recent history as it came out at the inquest.
The evidence of those who had played with him -- Mr. Murray, Sir John Hardy, and Colonel Moran -- showed that the game was whist, and that there was a fairly equal fall of the cards.
It came out in evidence that, in partnership with Colonel Moran, he had actually won as much as four hundred and twenty pounds in a sitting, some weeks before, from Godfrey Milner and Lord Balmoral.
He had also played there in the afternoon.
Sentence 9:
Ronald Adair was fond of cards -- playing continually, but never for such stakes as would hurt him. He was a member of the Baldwin, the Cavendish, and the Bagatelle card clubs.
He had played nearly every day at one club or other, but he was a cautious player, and usually rose a winner.
Adair might have lost five pounds, but not more.
His fortune was a considerable one, and such a loss could not in any way affect him.
It was shown that, after dinner on the day of his death, he had played a rubber of whist at the latter club.
So much for his recent history as it came out at the inquest.
The evidence of those who had played with him -- Mr. Murray, Sir John Hardy, and Colonel Moran -- showed that the game was whist, and that there was a fairly equal fall of the cards.
It came out in evidence that, in partnership with Colonel Moran, he had actually won as much as four hundred and twenty pounds in a sitting, some weeks before, from Godfrey Milner and Lord Balmoral.
He had also played there in the afternoon.